How To Get Better Posture and More Flexibility

I hear this all the time – someone says “I want to be more flexible, what stretches can I do so I can eventually touch my toes?” And then a look of confusion when I say something like “don’t keep stretching your legs, change the position of your pelvis instead.” Maybe you’re making a confused face right now as you read this. But I’m here to tell you continuing to stretch is not always the path to getting more flexibility. So then, what is? Changing your habits.

I’m currently reading the book Atomic Habits by James Clear. If you’re not familiar with this book, it’s about how we can use habits to change different aspects of our life. I’m only about 60 pages in so far, but I highly recommend it.

There’s a passage in the book that stood out to me and made me think about how our yoga practice is really just a physical expression of our daily habits. Here’s what he has to say:

“As habits form, your actions come under the direction of your automatic and non conscious mind. You fall into old patterns before you realize what’s happening. Unless someone points it out, you may not notice that you cover your mouth with your hand whenever you laugh, that you apologize before asking a question, or that you have a habit of finishing other people’s sentences. And the more you repeat these patterns, the less likely you become to question what you’re doing and why you’re doing it.”

This is part of the reason why a yoga practice can be so life changing for people. We’re unconsciously repatterning our brain and how we move. What muscles engage and which ones relax. We’re constantly feeding our brains and bodies information about how to move, which begins to infiltrate our unconscious movement and starts patterning in our bodies.

While yoga can do wonders for our aches and pains because we’re moving differently than how we’re used to, our bad movement habits can also rear their heads and stop us from achieving some of our goals, such as finally touching our toes and becoming more flexible.

Here’s how:

If we’re used to sitting at a desk all day for our jobs, chances are we’re sitting with our pelvis tucked under us, like this:

Instead of sitting on top of our pelvis with the natural curve (slight backbend) of the lower back, like this:

Eventually that tucked pelvis in the first picture is going to become a habit that you create in your body. Our brains will begin to know only this position, so when we try to do the opposite, it either can’t figure out how to do it, or our nervous system starts sending signals to our brains to interpret the movement as tight. Why? Because your nervous system is always trying to keep you safe, and when you start to move in a way that’s unfamiliar it freaks out because of uncharted waters.

This is all to say, use it or lose it is real you guys! BUT not necessarily permanent 🙂

Quick anatomy lesson: when you forward fold, your pelvis has to look more like the second picture than the first. Otherwise your forward fold starts to look something like this:

See the HUGE difference?

So if all your body knows is the first picture, it’s going to start to forward fold like the first picture – tucked pelvis, very rounded spine, and a feeling like your legs are tight, or your back is stretching. You’ll most likely feel stuck and assume that the tight feeling in your legs is what’s stopping you from touching the floor, but in reality it is more likely to be your daily habits!

SO here’s what I’m going to suggest you start doing TODAY to take actionable steps towards increasing your flexibility AND get better posture, all with one simple exercise:

While you’re sitting or standing at your desk at work, work on controlling the tilting of your pelvis. Bring your hands to your hips and tilt your pelvis forwards and backwards like in this video:

Start to get familiar with the position that tends to be your habit – are you more forwards, backwards, or neutral with your pelvis? Use a mirror if you need to see it rather than feel it. Then start to find a middle place where that lower back has a natural small backbend and you feel centered on top of your hips. And then do this AGAIN and AGAIN and make it a habit. If you can make sitting more like the second picture a habit, then I’m positive it’s going to change your flexibility (I’ve seen it in action with my private students!).

When this starts to become a habit in your daily life, start to make it a habit in your forward folds. Don’t just bend over. Focus on what you’re doing and fold from your pelvis tilting forwards. Let your pelvis initiate your movement towards your toes – not your spine. And then hit reply to this email and tell me what you’re noticing – I want to know!

If you’re interested in learning more, go ahead check out this 2-minute YouTube video I made that will teach you how to get better posture:

If you know someone who sits more like the first picture, make sure they see this blog post or the YouTube video so they can start to feel better during their workday!!

Make sense? Great! Got questions? Leave a comment below!

– Kate

My Experience Learning Yoga Through the Lens of Physical Therapy with Threesphysiyoga

In December 2019 I finished a 6 month 100-hour training with physical therapists who taught us yoga through the lens of physical therapy. Their goal was to start bringing smart, anatomy and biomechanic-based yoga into the yoga world. They threaded in PT exercises in a way that makes sense in a vinyasa yoga class and especially for one-on-one yoga sessions. The training was really about looking at how people move and how we can help people move better and be in less pain by using yoga and movement.

I’m going to be totally honest here – the reason I took this training was to get a really clear understanding of biomechanics and anatomy. Some of you may know I’m also a personal trainer, and that’s what that venture started out as as well. And here’s why:

There is a serious problem in the yoga teacher training world. We do not get trained to move bodies around. There’s very little focus on anatomy and even less of a focus on biomechanics, or how bodies move. A training can have as little as 5 hours of focus on these really important topics. The Yoga Alliance (which is all bullshit in my opinion – but that’s an email for another time lol) requires 20 hours of “anatomy” training, but what falls into that? Chakras. Koshas. Energetic “anatomy”. It only requires 5 hours of the sciencey-anatomy and biomecahnics. The Threesphysiyoga training was 100 HOURS of the sciencey anatomy and biomechanics. HUGE difference.

Let’s be realistic. That energetic stuff is all good and fine but at the end of the day you are moving your body around and don’t you want your trusted yoga instructor to understand why they’re asking you to do the things they’re asking you to do? I know I do and that’s why I took this training.

Before this training, I filled in the gaps with my personal training certification, as well as being in physical therapy myself for the last 2-3 years. My PT is awesome and teaches me why he’s telling me to do what I’m doing and explains how the body works so I can understand why I’m doing the exercises. Having this knowledge not only feels empowering for me, but it helps me understand the movements so when I’m doing them on my own I know what I should be feeling and what I shouldn’t be feeling. 

I want to be this type of yoga teacher for my students, so that’s why I took this training. I want you to leave my class feeling like you understood the direction it was going in and why I asked you to make that small adjustment with your foot. I want you to take home what you learned in class and be able to use it if you decide to get on the mat at home. I want you to understand why your lower back might be hurting you and even more importantly WHAT YOU CAN DO TO MAKE IT FEEL BETTER!

That being said, this training has completely changed my life, and subsequently I hope it changes the lives of my students – both in person and in my online studio. Personally I think my teaching has changed pretty drastically. It’s slowed down and gotten way more specific. 

Right now I’m really into making smaller movements to feel bigger things. I’m interested in asking my students questions about what they’re feeling such as can you find where you initiate your movement in a cat cow? Where does that show up in a bigger pose? Can you move your pelvis without moving your spine? Can you move your spine without moving your pelvis? 

If you’re interested in this stuff send me a message or leave a comment and ask me any questions you have about movement or the body or yoga or maybe you’re in pain and you want to figure out how yoga can help. I want to make it clear that I’m NOT a physical therapist, but I was taught yoga through the lens of physical therapy for the last 6 months and I really think there’s a way to use yoga to help people in pain.

Till next time,

Kate

P.S. If you enjoyed this blog post and want more yoga tips to help you build a stronger, more flexible and dependable body, join my mailing list where I send out weekly tips like this. You can sign up here. Please also feel free to share this with anyone who you think might benefit from these tips!

How to Help Your Balance & The Connection Between Your Toes and Balancing

I follow a guy named Dr. Perry Nickelston on Instagram (@stopchasingpain), and he made a post Tuesday morning about something that really struck me – how your toes compensate for a weak glute (aka butt muscle). 

Here’s what he said:

“Toe gripping is a compensation for glutei (aka butt muscles) that don’t work well”

He goes on in the caption to talk about this as it relates to our everyday lives like walking and pain we might feel, but I thought about this in relation to balancing poses in yoga.

Our glutes are stabilizer muscles. AKA they help us balance on one leg and on both legs. So when our glutes are weak, balance can become a challenge. And when something in the body is weak, usually your body tries to compensate for that weakness by finding strength and stability elsewhere. In this case – it’s your foot/toes. Go ahead and stand up, curl your toes in, and notice how it activates the muscles up the back of your leg, all the way to your butt. It’s not major – it’s definitely very slight – but if you really pay attention you can feel that. 

So, have you every noticed that when you balance on one leg in a yoga class, you grip your toes so much it feels like you’re trying to hold onto the floor? I know I have.

So for this blog post, I want you to try tree pose 3 ways: 

Stand up right now and come into a tree pose (stand on one leg and bring the other foot to your inner thigh or calf) – Notice what your toes are doing. Are they gripping and curling towards the floor?

Now try tree pose and lift the toes of your standing leg up. Did you fall over? I did when I tried this!

If you want to make this even harder, you can try standing on a block with your toes hanging off, or you can stand on a big book if you don’t have a block. Just make sure your toes are hanging off the edge of the block/book. Are you trying to hold the block/book with your toes? 

I’m curious to know how this goes for you. Leave me a comment and let me know if you felt yourself trying to grip with your toes! I know I do it!

Till next time,

Kate

P.S. If you enjoyed this blog post and want more yoga tips to help you build a stronger, more flexible and dependable body, join my mailing list where I send out weekly tips like this. You can sign up here. Please also feel free to share this with anyone who you think might benefit from these tips!

All Things Chaturanga Dandasana

I get asked about this pose ALL. THE. TIME. It’s one of the reasons people start seeing me for private yoga sessions. It is THE pose that everyone wants to know how to do, but is unfortunately the pose that us yoga teachers never actually take the time to teach.

There are so many ways you can build up to chaturanga in order to work on it STRONGLY instead of dropping into it and kind of flopping to the ground.

Why is it so hard? Let’s break it down:

  • It is technically an ARM BALANCE. That means all the weight is on your arms. TOUGH.
  • It requires huge amounts of wrist mobility and strength (like being able to put your wrist at 90 degrees)
  • It requires core strength so your hips don’t drop
  • It requires tricep strength because it is technically a tricep pushup
  • You pause (even if it’s for a split second) while you’re in it before pressing up to upward facing dog (which is another class coming to the studio in March!)
  • It requires chest strength
  • Your WHOLE BODY is integrated – your legs should be active even though the focus is on core and arms

I posted a short video on Instagram a few weeks ago about how chaturanga looks, what I often see in class, and what you can do on at home in order to work on your strength and chaturanga prep. Here it is:

Give that a try every day and I guarantee you you will feel stronger in your pose. Not only that, but learning chaturanga arms is KEY for arm balancing, so if that’s a goal of yours, definitely give those tips in the video a try.

I want to add one more thing. It’s small, but it’s KEY. 

WHEN YOU PULL FORWARDS INTO PLANK, TURN THE EYE OF YOUR ELBOW FORWARDS AND THEN BEND YOUR ELBOWS STRAIGHT BACK AND LOWER DOWN

If you’re unsure what the eye of an elbow looks like, here’s a picture of mine:

Why does this matter? Take a look at how I bend my arms when the eye of the elbow is forwards versus facing in (which is what typically happens)


 EYE OF THE ELBOW FACING IN —> ARMS BEND OUT TO THE SIDE

EYE OF THE ELBOW FORWARDS —> ARMS CAN BEND STRAIGHT BACK

As you can see, in order to bend your arms straight back you have to turn the eye of your elbow forwards – in other words EXTERNALLY rotate your arms WITHOUT adjusting your hands. This comes from the shoulder. Check out the video below to see what I mean:

So when you’re trying the moves in the first video, remember to point the eye of your elbow forward. See what changes it gives you. It is probably much harder! 

If you’re interested in diving deep into chaturanga, then make sure you sign up for my FREE chaturanga tutorial by clicking here

Till next time,

Kate

P.S. If you enjoyed this blog post and want more yoga tips to help you build a stronger, more flexible and dependable body, join my mailing list where I send out weekly tips like this. You can sign up here. Please also feel free to share this with anyone who you think might benefit from these tips!

How To Step Your Foot in Between Your Hands From Downward Facing Dog

I see this all the time. I say lift your right leg up, step your foot between your hands, and then a student’s foot lands somewhere halfway up their mat, their hip is jacked up in the air, their heel is off the ground, and they look unsure and uncomfortable in the lunge position. I’ll usually go up to that person and kneel by them and suggest they push their foot to the top of their mat, and then that’s what they’ll continue to do the rest of the class.

But wouldn’t it be nice if the foot just got there on its own?

Today’s video is all about getting that foot closer to the top of your mat. It’s not just luck that it lands there. There are tips and tricks you can do to get that foot to the top, or at least closer so that you’re in a more comfortable position in your lunges. Watch the video below and follow the step-by-step instructions to get that foot a little bit closer to the front of your mat next time the instructor says step your foot forward from downward facing dog!

Steps:

  1. Come into downward facing dog
  2. Lift your RIGHT leg up
  3. Come to the ball of your LEFT foot
  4. Draw your RIGHT knee into your chest, and as you do this bring your shoulders over your wrists as if you’re coming through a plank pose
  5. Press the floor away from you, round your back (think cat shape like in cat/cow) to make space for that knee
  6. Lean to the LEFT hand
  7. Lift to the fingertips of the RIGHT hand so there’s a little bit more space on that right side for you to get that leg through
  8. Step the foot!

I hope this helps you next time you’re in a vinyasa class and you’re trying to get that foot forwards. Give it a try at home on your own, or follow along to a class in my online studio to put these tips and tricks into practice!

Till next time,

Kate

P.S. If you enjoyed this blog post and want more yoga tips to help you build a stronger, more flexible and dependable body, join my mailing list where I send out weekly tips like this. You can sign up here. Please also feel free to share this with anyone who you think might benefit from these tips!

How Moving Differently Can Help You Feel Better

Other than maybe the bit of walking to and from work, how have you moved today?

Yesterday I joined a gym. I haven’t consistently been going to the gym in months, and to be totally honest, my back has been killing me. Yes, yoga does help my back at times, but I’ve found the thing that really helps me right now is lifting weights – specifically deadlifts. This is a story for another post, but what I want you to take away from this is that movement variety matters. I have an active job – I walk a ton every day, occasionally demo yoga poses, and then have my own home practice that I do. In general, it’s all very similar actions – yoga poses and walking. I could tell I needed something more, something different, so I signed up for this gym – and I have to tell you, after changing my movement practice up a bit, my back pain is gone and I feel like a million bucks! 

So…in the event that walking is the only movement you’ve done today (which, don’t get me wrong, isn’t bad, but it’s something we as humans do every day), here is a short sequence for you to watch at work and do at your desk, to get your body moving in a different way than it normally does. There’s no sound, so feel free to watch on your lunch break.

Let me know how you feel afterwards. A little bit of variety, and a little bit of movement, can go a long long way.

Till next time,

Kate

P.S. If you enjoyed this blog post and want more yoga tips to help you build a stronger, more flexible and dependable body, join my mailing list where I send out weekly tips like this. You can sign up here. Please also feel free to share this with anyone who you think might benefit from these tips!

Yoga Break to Help With Sitting at Work

When you sit at work, are you sitting up straight or are you rounding your upper back? What about during your commute? What about when you’re reading or texting or sitting on the couch watching tv? I catch myself doing this a lot, and I end up with upper back pain. Click the link below for a video I created about how to relieve some of this pain, and all you need is a desk or the back of a chair. 

If you’re at work and you can’t press play and listen to audio, see the step by step visual guide I created below.

1. Bring your hands to your desk or the back of your chair
2. Walk your feet back so your feet are under your hips
3. Let your head rest on your desk if it naturally lays there, otherwise you can drop your head or keep your neck in line with the rest of your spine – whatever feels best. 
4. Lean your weight back into your legs so that your spine and upper back stretch a little further. Take a few rounds of breath and stay as long as you want

IF YOU HAVE TIGHT HAMSTRINGS AND DON’T FEEL LIKE YOU CAN GET A STRAIGHT SPINE DO THIS:

1. Bring your hands to your desk or the back of your chair
2. Walk your feet back so your feet are under your hips
3. BEND YOUR KNEES
4. Lean your weight back into your legs so that your spine and upper back stretch a little further. Take a few rounds of breath and stay as long as you want

Give it a try and let me know if it helps! If you ever have any questions or feedback I would love to hear from you. Leave me a comment and send me your thoughts!

Till next time,

Kate

P.S. If you enjoyed this blog post and want more yoga tips to help you build a stronger, more flexible and dependable body, join my mailing list where I send out weekly tips like this. You can sign up here. Please also feel free to share this with anyone who you think might benefit from these tips!

Hip Stretch to Combat Sitting at Work

Sitting all day got your hips feeling stiff? Or maybe you stand all day at work and it leaves your hips achy and your back hurting? Try this video below and let me know if it relieves some of your aches and pains. If you’re at work and can’t do this with the sound on – don’t fret – step-by-step instructions are below the video. Feel free to respond to this email with any questions or feedback. Enjoy!

1. Sit comfortable on a chair with your feet touching the floor.
2. Cross your right ankle over your left knee. If this is a big stretch to your outer hip, then stay here. If you want to add a little more stretch you can place your hand on your right thigh bone and gently press down.
3. To increase the stretch even more, start to lean forward. Stop when the stretch feels good. 
4. If there is a desk in front of you, rest your head on the desk for extra relaxation.
5. Hold as long as you’d like, then switch to your other side.

Till next time,

Kate

P.S. If you enjoyed this blog post and want more yoga tips to help you build a stronger, more flexible and dependable body, join my mailing list where I send out weekly tips like this. You can sign up here. Please also feel free to share this with anyone who you think might benefit from these tips!

Dealing with Wrist Pain in Yoga

One of the most common things I hear from students is that yoga hurts their wrists, and what can they do to make it better, so I thought I’d write a blog addressing this super common issue.

So in general if you’re experiencing pain, my number one recommendation would be to go talk to a physical therapist about it before asking your yoga teacher. BUT once you’ve done that and determined there’s nothing serious going on, here are some tips and tricks to help your wrists with yoga.

First, if you haven’t checked out my YouTube vide on wrist pain in plank pose, give it a quick look. It’s only 4 minutes, and it goes over the most common basic reasons why people have wrist pain, and the easiest fixes for these pains.

Please hit Subscribe in YouTube to my channel if you like this video and want more like it!

If none of the issues in that video apply to you, then keep reading!

Unless you’ve had some major injury to your wrists, what I’ve found with my students is that in general, wrist pain is often due to a lack of wrist mobility. Usually people experience pain when they’re in a deeply extended position in the wrist forcing it into a 90 degree angle in something like a plank pose or arm balances. So first off let’s address wrist mobility!

How can you tell if you have good wrist mobility? Here’s a neat trick:

1) Bring your forearms together with your palms touching in front of your face like this:

2) Start to extend your wrists (aka bend them backwards – and yes, this is extension not flexion – if you want to talk an explanation as to why let me know and I’ll respond but I’m trying to not geek out over the biomechanices and explain in simple terms lol) as if you’re doing a plank pose. Are you able to get it to a 90 degree angle? Or are your fingers still facing relatively upright? You’re looking for something similar (or better than) this:

versus this:

So why does this make a difference? Well in short, if your body doesn’t have the ability to move itself into a particular range of motion, when you try to force it into that position and then put your body weight on top of it, it’ll probably hurt. That’s the gist of it at least (again, without getting too yoga-teacher-nerdy)

So if your wrists looked more like the second picture, here are some things you can do to help with your wrist mobility:

STEP ONE – Massage

First of all, roll out the muscles with something like a golf ball, lacrosse ball, or if you happen to have yoga tune up balls those are perfect. Massage out the front and back of your forearm, your hand, and all the muscles surrounding your wrist.

STEP TWO – Mobilize

Next, you’ll want to bring in some mobilizing movements. You may have done this in class with me before. You’ll place your forearm on your thigh. Make a fist with your hand tight enough so that you can feel your muscles engage. Place your other hand on your forearm to anchor it down. From here, WITHOUT moving your forearm, you’ll start to make SLOW circles with your fist. What often happens is that our forearms want to do the work for us here, but you’re going to be super diligent and honest with yourself about what is actual creating the movement. THIS WILL FEEL HARD. If you move quickly, you’ll lose control and your forearm will do the work of your wrist and you won’t feel anything or get anywhere. Think about it as if you’re driving a car – the faster you go, the less control over the vehicle you’d have. Same thing with mobility work. Slow wins the race.​

STEP THREE – Strengthen

Finally, you’ll strengthen those wrist muscles by doing wrist pushups. Again slow, honest, and intentional movement is the key here. Here are the directions:

  1. Come onto your hands and knees. If you have yoga blocks I would suggest putting them under your hands on the lowest height with the heels of your hands hanging off the blocks. If you don’t have yoga blocks you can just put your hands on the floor – it’s just easier to feel this exercise on blocks.
  2. Imagine you could drag your hands backwards. They won’t actually move, but what you’ll feel is the muscles starting to engage.
  3. Start to slowly lift your wrists up and down into small wrist pushups. If you do this correctly, you will feel the mucles around the wrists burning from working hard almost immediately.
    1. A common mistake I see –> Doing finger pushups – instead of lifting the wrists, people bend at their knuckles. Make sure you’re bending your wrists not your fingers. Again, if you feel nothing in the wrists, try to find that engagement of tugging your hands back

It should look like this:

Do these 3 things, in this particular order and see if it starts to help you at all with your wrist mobility in weight-bearing poses like plank etc. If any of these movements hurt, do NOT do them. Again, if you’re in pain I always recommend seeing either a PT or a doctor. Yoga is great for a lot of things, but we are not doctors and are not pain specialists, so your first step should always be to see a licensed professional, and then they can work closely with your yoga instructor to make sure you’re getting help in all the areas of your life you want 🙂

Give these a try and let me know how it goes and if you have any questions about anything at all!

Till next time,

Kate

P.S. If you want more tips and tricks like this for wrist pain, I actually have a few wrist pain-specific P.S. If you enjoyed this blog post and want more yoga tips to help you build a stronger, more flexible and dependable body, join my mailing list where I send out weekly tips like this. You can sign up here. Please also feel free to share this with anyone who you think might benefit from these tips!

5 Tips to Nail Your Crow Pose

Every time I’ve taught a one-on-one session with someone, it was always for 2 reasons: they wanted to nail crow or they wanted to understand chaturanga. These also happen to be 2 of the poses I feel most confident to teach. I’m not gonna lie – it’s a really really hard pose. So I’ve come up with a list of 5 tips I can share with you so that you can nail your next crow, or at least get a little closer to sticking the landing.​

1. Go Forwards More

This is my number 1 tip for people who are trying to get into the pose. If you’re someone who, when you fall out of crow, you fall backwards, it means you’re not going far enough forward. Not sure how far forward you should be going? Here’s a picture of me in crow. Check out the line I drew. It is SO far in front of my wrists. Not going to lie here though – your wrist mobility needs to be pretty good for this to feel ok. Not sure if you have great wrist mobility? Don’t worry – that post is coming soon! (make sure you’re on my email list to stay up to date!)

2. Stop Jumping

If you’re someone who jumps into your crow poses, I’m looking at you. Instead of jumping, try controlling your lift off. It’ll make it much easier for you to stay in the pose once you find lift off. This is tied to step number 1 – if you go forwards enough, your feet will float off the ground, making jumping unnecessary.

3. Increase Your Hamstring Strength

This will help you with step number 2. Long story short, your hamstrings help you pull your heels to your butt. If you can use your hamstrings to pick your feet up, rather than the momentum of jumping, you’ll have an easier time controlling where your body is in space and sticking the arm balance. Not sure how to work on strengthening your hamstrings? Again – not to worry – this post is coming soon (make sure you’re on my email list to stay up to date!)

4. Bend Your Elbows Straight Back

As you squat down, slide your elbows straight back into your shins. Bend them back into your shins – not out to the side. Find a 90 degree angle with your arms. Think of Chaturanga arms. These are all cues that say the exact same thing. Again look at the picture of me above – my elbows are pointing backwards, not out to the side. Sure, they’re not at a 90 degree angle, but they started at one.

5. Just Fall

If you’re scared of falling, just go ahead and do it so you can experience it. You’ll realize that it’s not so bad, which will help you overcome that fear. More often than not this is the number 1 culprit when it comes to why someone can’t get into crow pose, or any other arm balance for that matter. And I get it. I had that fear too. I even face planted once in class. Guess what? No broken nose. No broken face. No blood or tears. What it did was get me over my fear of falling on my face because I had already done it and realized there’s nothing to be afraid of anymore. Falling out of an arm balance is one of the more important things you can do because it allows you to overcome your fear of it. I’m not suggesting you go and fall and hurt your face or your wrists. But grab like 10 pillows and surround yourself and then work on your crow so you feel a little bit better when and if you fall forwards.

Give these things a try and let me know how it goes. And if you want more instruction and more cues, make sure you check out my arm balance classes in my online studio. You’ll learn the tips and tricks in real time that I use to get into these crazy ass shapes and the ways you can use yoga to strengthen and train your body to nail these harder poses.

As always, let me know if you have any questions and good luck with your crows!

Till next time,

Kate

P.S. If you enjoyed this blog post and want more yoga tips to help you build a stronger, more flexible and dependable body, join my mailing list where I send out weekly tips like this. You can sign up here. Please also feel free to share this with anyone who you think might benefit from these tips!